Pop Culture Librarians: Ook! A Meditation on Discworld’s Librarian

The Librarian in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series manages the often dangerous grimoires at Unseen University while frequently navigating L-Space (Library -Space).  In L-Space [represented as Books = Knowledge = Power = (Force x Distance^2) ÷ Time], the collection of many magical books acts as a power source that opens a portal connecting all libraries that allows librarians to traverse time and space to fulfill library functions such as retrieving books and scrolls from long lost libraries, as seen briefly in Small Gods. While The Librarian can bend space and time to gather books, he, like all librarians, must abide by the following rules:

  1. Silence
  2. Books must be returned by the last date stamped
  3. Do not interfere with the nature of causality

Once upon a time, The Librarian was human, but a magical accident in The Light Fantastic turned him into an orangutan and he found he preferred this form. It’s much easier to reach the high shelves when one is an orangutan. Don’t even think of trying to change him back! Despite the fact that The Librarian at Unseen University communicates through a series of Ooks and Eeks, all of his colleagues understand him and know, above all else, to never refer to this orangutan as a monkey.  He might go all librarian-poo on them.

"Librarian (Discworld)" by Paul Kidby - Scanned from The Pratchett PortfolioCopyright Terry Pratchett and Paul Kidby. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Librarian_(Discworld).jpg#/media/File:Librarian_(Discworld).jpg

“Librarian (Discworld)” by Paul Kidby – Scanned from The Pratchett PortfolioCopyright Terry Pratchett and Paul Kidby. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia –

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About Katy

Some of the books I've recently come to love include Signal To Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, The Just City by Jo Walton, Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead, and Bug In A Vacuum by Melanie Watt. I'm a firm believer in the power of the Oxford comma.
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